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I had chosen to do the brief of EVERYDAY WELL-BEING as I am interested in things related to psychology. I know that mental illness feels just as bad, or worse, than any other illness but we can’t see it like other injuries and sickness. Some mental health problems are described using words that are in everyday use; for example, ‘depression’ or ‘anxiety’. This can make them seem easier to understand, but can also mean people underestimate how serious they can be. It can even cause death if it isn’t taken care of, I can see lots of news about suicide, mostly teenagers, this is because they can’t handle their depression and negative thoughts.

Mixed anxiety and depression are the most common mental health disorder, although many cases are not severe enough to require specific treatment. Mental health problems include eating disorders, obsessive compulsive disorder, addiction to drugs and alcohol, personality disorders, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Mental illness and psychological disorders have good treatment options with medications, psychotherapy or other treatments.

Every year, about one in four people in the UK may experience some kind of mental health problem. Although mental health problems are very common, stigma and discrimination towards people with mental health problems is still very common and there are a lot of myths about what different diagnoses mean. However, despite these challenges, it is possible to recover from a mental health problem and live a productive and fulfilling life.

Common behaviours

In addition to more formal diagnoses mentioned above, there are some behaviours and feelings which are strongly associated with mental health problems.

Self-harm

Self-harm is a way of expressing very deep distress. You may not know why you self-harm, but it can be a means of communicating what you can’t put into words, or even into thoughts, and has been described as an ‘inner scream’. After self-harming, you may feel better able to cope with life again, for a while, but the cause of your distress is unlikely to have gone away.

Suicidal thoughts

It is common to have suicidal thoughts if you are experiencing mental health problems – especially if you have a diagnosis of depression, borderline personality disorder or schizophrenia. The deeper your depression, the more likely it is that you will consider killing yourself. However, you can help yourself and you can get help from other people. A great many people think about suicide, but the majority do not go on to kill themselves.

Panic attacks

These are sudden, unexpected bouts of intense terror. If you experience an attack you may find it hard to breathe, and feel your heart beating hard. You may have a choking sensation, chest pain, begin to tremble or feel faint. It’s easy to mistake these for the signs of a heart attack or other serious medical problem. Panic attacks can occur at any time, and this is what distinguishes them from a natural response to real danger.

Causes

-Heredity (genetics): Many mental illnesses run in families, suggesting they may be passed on from parents to children through genes. Hereditary just means that you are more likely to get the condition than if you didn’t have an affected family member.

Brain chemistry/Biology: abnormal balance of brain chemicals, leading to symptoms of mental illness (Brain Injury)

Psychological trauma & Social Factors: Some mental illnesses may be triggered by psychological trauma suffered as a child, such as severe emotional, physical, or sexual abuse; a significant early loss, such as the loss of a parent; and neglect.

  • Lack of support from relationships;
  • Child abuse and neglect;
  • Family violence;
  • Severe or prolonged stress;
  • Unemployment;
  • Major changes in life.

 

source:

http://www.webmd.boots.com/mental-health/default.htm

http://www.mind.org.uk/information-support/types-of-mental-health-problems/mental-health-problems-introduction/#.UtWRNvRdVqV

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